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Python: Input and Output statements

Input Statements: Reading dynamic data from keyboard

Python 2: In Python 2, two functions are available for input:

  1. raw.input() 

  2. input()

X=raw.input(‘enter some number’)

Whatever input we provide, it is always treated as str type only. Hence you have to use typecasting functions.

Y=input(‘Enter some number’)

No need to use type casting functions as it takes the input as it is.

 

Python 3: In Python 3 only one function is available that is input().

X=input(‘Enter some number:’)

Input statements
Python Input Statements

Input function is always considered as string. Hence you have to use typecasting functions.  

Example 1: Write a program to read two numbers from keyboard and print their sum.

Python Input Statements
Python Input Statements

Example 2: Write a program to read employee data from keyboard and print it.

Python Input Statements
Python Input Statements

If you want to take multiple input in one line

Python Input Statements
Python Input Statements

Example 3: Read 2 float values from the keyboard which are specified with separation and print sum

Python Input Statements
Python Input Statements

eval(): eval function prints type of data entered. If we enter integer data, then output from eval function will be 'int' and likewise.

Python Input Statements
Python Input Statements

Command Line Arguments

The argument which are passing from command prompt are called command line argument.

For example py test.py 10 20 30 40 50 (command line argument)

argv:

  • Predefined variable

  • Internally it holds all command line value

  • It is list type and available in sys module.

If you want to use argv from sys module, then you have to import it.

Example:

Command Line Arguments
Python Command Line Arguments
Python Command Line Arguments

Example: Read a group of int values from the keyboard as command line arguments and print sum.

Python Command Line Arguments
Python Command Line Arguments

Output Statements

print () function is  used to print some statement to the console.

Form 1: print() without any argument

a new line or empty line character will be inserted.

Form 2: print(str) with string argument

print(“Hello”)

print(“mujtaba”)

Output statements
Python Output Statements

Form 3: print() with variable number of arguments

Example:

a,b,c=10,20,30

print(“The values are:”,a,b,c)

Python Output Statements

Form 4: print with sep (separator) attribute

It is used to separate attribute by space or comma or colon within the attribute.

By default comma (,) is the separator between the attributes

Example:

print(a,b,c,sep=’:’)

Python Output Statements

Form 5: print() with end attribute

By default print is going to print in new line. If you don’t want to print in new line, you can go for end attribute.

Python Output Statements

Example:

print(“hello”,end=” ”)

print(“mujtaba”)

Python Output Statements

Form 6: print(object)

Python 311.jpeg

Form 7: print(string, variable list)

You can use print() statement with string and any number of arguments.

It is used  to represent or mix up the variable.

Python Output Statements

Form 8: print(formatted string)

%i == > int type

%d == > int type

%f == > float type

% s == > str type

print(“formatted string” %(variable list))

Example:

a,b,c=10,20

print(“a value is %i and b value is %i” %(a,b))

Python Output Statements

Form 9: print() function with replacement operator

{} == > replacement operator          

It is used to format the output in desired forms.

For example:

name=’Mujtaba’

age=1 

                                     

Type 1

Python Output Statements

Type 2

Python Output Statements

Type 3

Python Output Statements
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